Keynote Lectures

ICCS is well known for its excellent line up of keynote speakers. This page will be frequently updated with new names, lecture titles and abstracts.

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS

Douglas Kothe, Exascale Computing Project, USA

James Moore, Imperial College London, UK

Robert Panoff, The Shodor Education Foundation, USA

Xiaoxiang Zhu, Technical University of Munich, Germany
Data Science in Earth Observation

Doug Kothe
Douglas Kothe
Exascale Computing Project, USA
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Douglas B. Kothe (Doug) has over three decades of experience in conducting and leading applied R&D in computational applications designed to simulate complex physical phenomena in the energy, defense, and manufacturing sectors. Doug is currently the Director of the Exascale Computing Project (ECP). Prior to that, he was Deputy Associate Laboratory Director of the Computing and Computational Sciences Directorate (CCSD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Other prior positions for Doug at ORNL, where he has been since 2006, include Director of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, DOE’s first Energy Innovation Hub (2010-2015), and Director of Science at the National Center for Computational Sciences (2006-2010).
Before coming to ORNL, Doug spent 20 years at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he held a number of technical and line and program management positions, with a common theme being the development and application of modeling and simulation technologies targeting multi-physics phenomena characterized in part by the presence of compressible or incompressible interfacial fluid flow. Doug also spent one year at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the late 1980s as a physicist in defense sciences.
Doug holds a Bachelor in Science in Chemical Engineering from the University of Missouri – Columbia (1983) and a Masters in Science (1986) and Doctor of Philosophy (1987) in Nuclear Engineering from Purdue University.

ABSTRACT
Coming soon.
James Moore
James Moore
Imperial College London, UK
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Dr. Moore was born in Toccoa, Georgia, and received his Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering in 1987, his Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering in 1988 and his Ph.D. in 1991, all from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He was the first PhD student of Dr. David N. Ku, MD PhD, and his thesis work was a collaborative project with vascular surgeon Dr. Christopher Zarins and vascular pathologist Dr. Seymour Glagov. He had postdoctoral training at the Swiss Institute of Technology at Lausanne, 1991 – 1994, where he also helped set up a new biomedical engineering lab. From 1994 – 2003 Dr. Moore served as a professor of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, Florida International University. He moved to Texas A&M University in 2003, where he served as the Carolyn S. and Tommie E. Lohman ’59 Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Director of Graduate Studies. In Jaunary 2013, he joined Imperial College as the Bagrit and Royal Academy of Engineering Chair in Medical Device Design, and Director of Research for the Department of Bioengineering.
Dr. Moore’s research interests include Cardiovascular Biomechanics, Stents, Implantable Devices, Atherosclerosis, and the Lymphatic System. His research focuses on the role of biomechanics in the formation and treatment of diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer. His cardiovascular biomechanics research includes the first finite element models of artery walls to include residual stress, the first studies of the effects of combined flow and stretch on vascular endothelium, early work on the effects of myocardial contraction on coronary artery flow patterns, and the first studies of the effects of stents on both blood flow patterns and artery wall stress. This work resulted in the development of two novel stent designs aimed at optimizing post-implant biomechanics for the prevention of restenosis, as well as new testing devices for implants that employ more physiologic mechanical forces (currently marketed by Bose). His work on the effects of stretch gradients on cells was awarded best paper of the year in the Journal of Biomechanical Engineering for 2011. In collaboration with Dr. Kumbakonam Rajagopal, he developed constitutive models of strain-accelerated degradation of polymers used in medical implants. His research on lymphatic system biomechanics, initiated in 2004 with Dr. David Zawieja, has provided unprecedented insight into the pumping characteristics of the system and the transport of nitric oxide, antigens, and chemokines in lymphatic tissues. He is currently developing two technologies for preventing and resolving secondary lymphedema, which typically forms subsequent to cancer surgery. Along with his funding from government, charity, and industry sources, Dr. Moore has received multiple patents for medical devices and testing equipment. Dr. Moore has also co-founded two startup companies.

ABSTRACT
Coming soon.
Robert Panoff
Robert Panoff
The Shodor Education Foundation, USA
WEB

Dr. Robert M. Panoff is founder and Executive Director of The Shodor Education Foundation, Inc., and has been a consultant at several national laboratories. He is also a frequent presenter at NSF- sponsored workshops on visualization, supercomputing, and networking, and continues to serve as consultant for the education program at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has served on the advisory panel for Applications of Advanced Technology program at NSF. Dr. Panoff received his M.A. and Ph.D. in theoretical physics from Washington University in St. Louis, undertaking both pre- and postdoctoral work at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University.
As principal investigator on several NSF grants that seek to explore the interaction of high performance computing technologies and education, he worked to develop a series of interactive simulations which combine supercomputing resources and desktop computers. Besides developing and teaching a new course in Information Technologies, Dr. Panoff continues an active research program in computational condensed matter physics while defining and implementing educational initiatives at the Shodor Foundation.
At Kansas State University and Clemson University from 1986-1990, he developed a fully interdisciplinary computational science and engineering course. He served as director of the Carolinas Institute in Computational Science, an NSF-funded initiative in Undergraduate Faculty Enhancement, 1991-1993. His work has won several major science and education awards, including the 1990 Cray Gigaflop Performance Award in Supercomputing, the 1994 and 1995 Undergraduate Computational Science Education Awards from the U.S. Department of Energy, and a 1995 Achievement Award from the Chicago Chapter of the Society for Technical Communication. In 1993-1994, his interactive simulations were used as the basis of an international science collaboration demonstrating network technologies involving four of the schools from the Department of Defense Dependent Schools, for which he received a letter of commendation from the Department of Defense. In recognition of Dr. Panoff’s efforts in undergraduate faculty enhancement and curriculum development, the Shodor Foundation was named in 1996 as a Foundation Partner of the National Science Foundation for the revitalization of undergraduate education.

ABSTRACT
Coming soon.
Data Science in Earth Observation
Xiaoxiang Zhu
Technical University of Munich, Germany
WEB

Xiaoxiang Zhu is the professor for Signal Processing in Earth Observation (SiPEO, www.sipeo.bgu.tum.de) at Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR), Germany. She is also the founding head of the department of EO Data Science in DLR’s Earth Observation Center. Zhu received the Master (M.Sc.) degree, her doctor of engineering (Dr.-Ing.) degree and her “Habilitation” in the field of signal processing from TUM in 2008, 2011 and 2013, respectively. She was a guest scientist or visiting professor at the Italian National Research Council (CNR-IREA), Naples, Italy, Fudan University, Shanghai, China, the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan and University of California, Los Angeles, United States in 2009, 2014, 2015 and 2016, respectively.
The research of Xiaoxiang focuses on signal processing and data science in earth observation. Geoinformation derived from Earth observation satellite data is indispensable for many scientific, governmental and planning tasks. Furthermore, Earth observation has arrived in the Big Data era with ESA’s Sentinel satellites and NewSpace companies. Xiaoxiang Zhu develops explorative signal processing and machine learning algorithms, such as compressive sensing and deep learning, to improve information retrieval from remote sensing data, and to enable breakthroughs in geoscientific and environmental research. In particular, by the fusion of petabytes of EO data from satellite to social media, she aims at tackling challenges such as mapping of global urbanization.
Xiaoxiang Zhu is an associate editor of IEEE TGRS and SPIE JARS and the author of 250 scientific publications, among them about 160 full-paper-peer-reviewed and 10 paper awards. She has received several important scientific awards and grants, for example the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz-Preis of the German Research Foundation (DFG) in 2015, Innovators under 35 of Technology Review Germany in 2015, IEEE GRSS Early Career Award in 2016, ERC Starting Grant in 2016, PRACE Ada Lovelace Award for HPC in 2018 and Helmholtz Excellence Professorship in 2018 etc.

ABSTRACT
Coming soon.