Keynote Lectures

ICCS is well known for its line-up of keynote speakers.
This page will be frequently updated with new names, lecture titles and abstracts.

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS

David Abramson
Director, Research Computing Centre, Professor of Computer Science, FACM, FIEEE, FTSE, FACS, The University of Queensland
Australia

Manuel Castro Díaz
University of Málaga
Spain

Jiří Mikyška
Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering, Department of Mathematics – Mathematical Modelling Group
Czechia
        Computational Methods in Thermodynamics of Multicomponent Mixtures with Applications in Compositional Simulation

Takemasa Miyoshi
Team Leader, Data Assimilation Research Team RIKEN Center for Computational Science
Japan

Coral Calero Muñoz
University of Castilla-La Mancha
Spain
        Software: to green or not to green, that’s the question

Petra Ritter
BIH Johanna Quandt Professor for Brain Simulation, Director, Brain Simulation Section, Berlin Institute of Health & Dept. of Neurology, Charité University Hospital Berlin
Germany

 
David Abramson
David Abramson
The University of Queensland, Australia
WEB

 

David is a Professor of Computer Science, and currently heads the University of Queensland Research Computing Centre.
He has been involved in computer architecture and high performance computing research since 1979.
He has held appointments at Griffith University, CSIRO, RMIT and Monash University.
Prior to joining UQ, he was the Director of the Monash e-Education Centre, Science Director of the Monash e-Research Centre, and a Professor of Computer Science in the Faculty of Information Technology at Monash.
From 2007 to 2011 he was an Australian Research Council Professorial Fellow.
David has expertise in High Performance Computing, distributed and parallel computing, computer architecture and software engineering.
He has produced in excess of 230 research publications, and some of his work has also been integrated in commercial products. One of these, Nimrod, has been used widely in research and academia globally, and is also available as a commercial product, called EnFuzion, from Axceleon.
His world-leading work in parallel debugging is sold and marketed by Cray Inc, one of the world’s leading supercomputing vendors, as a product called ccdb.
David is a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), the Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering (ATSE), and the Australian Computer Society (ACS).
His hobbies include recreational cycling, photography and making stained glass windows. He is also an amateur playwright, and author of Purely Academic.

ABSTRACT
Coming soon.
 
Manuel Castro Diaz
Manuel Castro Díaz
University of Málaga, Spain
WEB

 

Manuel Castro Díaz is Full Professor at the University of Málaga and a member of the EDANYA group (Differential Equations Numerical Analysis and Applications), focusing his research on the numerical analysis of non-conservative hyperbolic systems and the modeling of geophysical flows. Specifically, he has been working on the development and analysis of numerical schemes for those systems in the framework of ‘path-conservative’ finite volume method, with applications to the simulation of coastal currents, floods, avalanches, sediment transport, turbidity currents, generation and propagation of tsunamis, biphasic flows, magnetohydrodynamics, etc … He has also been interested in the efficient implementation of the numerical models using multicore and multiGPU architectures and, more recently, on uncertainty quantification, data assimilation, and on the application of deep neural networks in the framework of tsunami modelling. He has published more than 100 works, most of them in top rated journals on Numerical Analysis, Computer Science and Geophysical applications. He was awarded with the J.Lions Lions Award to Young Scientists in Computational Mathematics, awarded by ECCOMAS in 2008, and in 2018, his group EDANYA was awarded with the Nvidia Global Impact Award 2018, for its contributions in tsunami modeling, and in particular for the numerical development of Tsunami-HySEA model, that has been incorporated in the core of several national tsunami early warning systems. Finally, his name has been included in the Stanford world’s top 2% Scientist 2021 and he was honored to be lecturer at the ICM 2018 in the Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computing section.

ABSTRACT
Coming soon.
Computational Methods in Thermodynamics of Multicomponent Mixtures with Applications in Compositional Simulation
Jiri Mikyska
Jiří Mikyška
Czech Technical University in Prague, Czechia
WEB

 

Jiří Mikyška is a professor of applied mathematics at the Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague. The principal focus of our research is on the development of robust and efficient numerical methods for simulation of transport processes in porous media with applications in enhanced oil recovery, hydrogen storage, or CO2 sequestration. Research is carried out in two major directions – Thermodynamics of multicomponent mixtures and compositional simulation. Thermodynamics of multicomponent mixtures involves development of new thermodynamic formulations and new robust and efficient numerical algorithms for phase stability testing of multicomponent mixtures, computation of multi-phase equilibria. The compositional simulation involves development of new formulations of transport models and coupling them to the thermodynamic models. We focus on advanced and higher-order discretization methods (mixed and mixed-hybrid finite element methods, finite volume methods, discontinuous Galerkin methods), on different schemes for coupling the transport and thermodynamic models, and on inclusion of various transport processes into the model (convection, diffusion, gravity, viscosity, capillarity).

ABSTRACT
Coming soon.
Software: to green or not to green, that’s the question
Coral Calero
Coral Calero Muñoz
University of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain
WEB

 

Coral Calero is Professor at the University of Castilla-La Mancha in Spain and has a PhD in Computer Science. She is a member of the Alarcos Research Group, being responsible of the “Green and Sustainable software” line research, where two main lines of work are developed. The first one addresses issues such as measuring the impact that software and information systems have on the environment and how to improve its energy efficiency, as well as human and economic aspects related to software sustainability. The second major line of work supports all the group’s dissemination activities to raise awareness of the impact that software has on the environment.

ABSTRACT
That software moves the world is a clear fact. And that it is becoming more and more important, too. There are three aspects that have led to an increase in the intensity with which software is used: the Internet and social networks, data and artificial intelligence.
However, not everything is positive in the support that software provides to our daily lives. There are estimates that ICT will be responsible for 20% of global energy consumption by 2030, part of which will be due to software. And precisely the three mentioned aspects require large amounts of energy.
In this keynote we will review different concepts related to software sustainability, and we will show some results of software consumption measurements that we have carried out on the one hand, cases carried out to raise awareness in society in general about the impact that software has on the environment. On the other hand, examples related to the consumption of data and artificial intelligence carried out with the aim of creating a set of best practices for the software professionals.
Our ultimate goal is to make you aware of the consumption problem associated with software and to ensure that, if at first, we were concerned with the “what” and later with the “how”, now it is time to focus on the “with what”.