Keynote Lectures

ICCS is well known for its excellent line up of keynote speakers. This page will be updated with the lecture titles and abstracts.

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS

Albert-László Barabási, Northeastern University, USA

Lorena Barba, George Washington University, USA

Peter Hunter, The University of Auckland, New Zealand

Marten Scheffer, SparcS Center, The Netherlands

 
Albert-László Barabási
Albert-László Barabási
Northeastern University, USA
WEB 

 

Albert-László Barabási is the Robert Gray Dodge Professor of Network Science and a Distinguished University Professor at Northeastern University, where he directs the Center for Complex Network Research, and holds appointments in the Departments of Physics and College of Computer and Information Science, as well as in the Department of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women Hospital in the Channing Division of Network Science, and is a member of the Center for Cancer Systems Biology at Dana Farber Cancer Institute. A Hungarian born native of Transylvania, Romania, he received his Masters in Theoretical Physics at the Eötvös University in Budapest, Hungary and was awarded a Ph.D. three years later at Boston University. Barabási latest book is Network Science (Cambridge University Press, 2016). He has also authored “Linked: The New Science of Networks” (Perseus, 2002), currently available in fifteen languages, “Bursts: The Hidden Pattern Behind Everything We Do” (Dutton, 2010) available in five languages, and is the co-editor of “The Structure and Dynamics of Networks” (Princeton, 2005). His work lead to the discovery of scale-free networks in 1999, and proposed the Barabási-Albert model to explain their widespread emergence in natural, technological and social systems, from the cellular telephone to the WWW or online communities.
Barabási is a Fellow of the American Physical Society. In 2005 he was awarded the FEBS Anniversary Prize for Systems Biology and in 2006 the John von Neumann Medal by the John von Neumann Computer Society from Hungary, for outstanding achievements in computer-related science and technology. In 2004 he was elected into the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and in 2007 into the Academia Europaea. He received the C&C Prize from the NEC C&C Foundation in 2008. In 2009 APS chose him Outstanding Referee and the US National Academies of Sciences awarded him the 2009 Cozzarelli Prize. In 2011 Barabási was awarded the Lagrange Prize-CRT Foundation for his contributions to complex systems, awarded Doctor Honoris Causa from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, became an elected fellow in AAAS (Physics), then in 2013 Fellow of the Massachusetts Academy of Sciences and, just recently, the 2014 Prima Primissima Award for his contributions to network science by the Hungarian Association of Entrepreneurs and Employers.

 
Lorena Barba
Lorena Barba
George Washington University, USA
WEB 

 

Lorena A. Barba is professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the George Washington University in Washington, DC. She holds a PhD in aeronautics from the California Institute of Technology and BSc/PEng degrees in mechanical engineering from Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Chile. Her research includes computational fluid dynamics, high-performance computing, computational biophysics, and animal flight.
An international leader in computational science and engineering, she is also a long-standing advocate of open source software for science and education, and she is well known for her courses and open educational resources. She was a recipient of the 2016 Leamer-Rosenthal Award for Open Social Sciences, and in 2017, was nominated and received an honorable mention in the Open Education Awards for Excellence of the Open Education Consortium.
Dr. Barba has served since 2014 in the Board of Directors for NumFOCUS, a 501(c)3 public charity in the United States that supports and promotes world-class, innovative, open-source scientific software. She is also an expert in research reproducibility, and was a member of the National Academies study committee on Reproducibility and Replicability in Science, which released its report in May 2019. She serves as the Reproducibility Chair for the SC19 (Supercomputing) Conference, is track editor for Reproducible Research in IEEE Computing in Science Engineers, is an Associate Editor-in-Chief for the Journal of Open Source Software and Editor-in-Chief of The Journal of Open Source Education.
Barba received the NSF Faculty Early CAREER award (2012), was named CUDA Fellow by NVIDIA Corp. (2012), is an awardee of the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) First Grant program (2007), and was an Amelia Earhart Fellow of the Zonta Foundation (1999).
See also: http://about.me/lorenabarba
And on Twitter: twitter.com/LorenaABarba

 
Peter Hunter
Peter Hunter
The University of Auckland, New Zealand
WEB 

 

Peter Hunter completed his Engineering and Masters of Engineering degrees at the University of Auckland before undertaking his DPhil (PhD) in Physiology at the University of Oxford where he researched finite element modeling of ventricular mechanics. Since then his major research interests have been around modelling various aspects of the human body using specially developed computational algorithms and an anatomically and biophysically based approach which incorporates the detailed anatomical and microstructural measurements and material properties into continuum models.
Peter has received numerous accolades for his work and in 2010 was appointed to the NZ Order of Merit. In 2009, he was awarded the Rutherford Medal, New Zealand’s top science award, as well as the KEA World Class NZ award in Research, Science, Technology and Academia. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand in 1994 and a Fellow of the Royal Society (London) in 2006.
As recent Co-Chair of the Physiome Committee of the International Union of Physiological Sciences, Peter is helping to develop standards based physiological models and the use of computational methods for understanding the integrated physiological function of the body in terms of the structure and function of tissues, cells and proteins.
Alongside his role as Director of the Auckland Bioengineering Institute and Professor of Engineering Science at the University of Auckland, Peter is also a Deputy Director of the Medical Technologies Centre of Research Excellence (MedTech CoRE) hosted by the University of Auckland. He holds honorary or visiting Professorships at a number of universities around the world and is on the scientific advisory boards of a number of research institutes in Europe, the US and the Asia-Pacific region.

 
Marten Scheffer
Marten Scheffer
SparcS Center, The Netherlands
WEB 

 

Marten Scheffer is interested in unravelling the mechanisms that determine the stability and resilience of complex systems. Although much of his work has focused on ecosystems, he also worked with a range of scientists from other disciplines to address issues of stability and shifts in natural and social systems. Examples include the feedback between atmospheric carbon and the earth temperature, the collapse of ancient societies, inertia and shifts in public opinion, evolutionary emergence of patterns of species similarity, the effect of climatic extremes on forest dynamics and the balance of facilitation and competition in plant communities. With the help of a Spinoza award and an ERC advanced grant he founded SparcS and now works on finding generic early warning signals for critical transitions. He also co-founded the ‘South American Institute for Resilience and Sustainability Studies’ SARAS and is currently a distinguished professor at Wageningen University.